Polyamory.com Forum  

Go Back   Polyamory.com Forum > Polyamory > Fireplace

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 04-02-2011, 11:53 PM
Tonberry Tonberry is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,393
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Derbylicious View Post
unnesecery(sp?)
Unnecessary.

It's all extremely interesting. I don't know much about breastfeeding, except for the fact that even though I don't want biological children, if I adopt a child who is still young I want to breastfeed them, so I looked into inducing breastfeeding without a pregnancy a bit. But that's pretty much as far as I went.

That, and until fairly recently, I actually thought the only cases when babies weren't breastfed were when they were allergic to breast milk (my younger brother was so we fed him formula instead).
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 04-03-2011, 10:23 AM
BlackUnicorn's Avatar
BlackUnicorn BlackUnicorn is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 906
Default

A baby can have a heart condition that prevents them from sucking hard enough to 'order' their rations of milk from the boobies. That's at least how I understood the trouble in one family I know.

Also, for whatever reason, not all women really produce enough milk. Can Magdlyn or Derbie or someone else in the know explain why?
__________________
Me: bi female in my twenties
Dating: Moonlightrunner
Metamour: Windflower
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 04-03-2011, 07:54 PM
Tonberry Tonberry is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,393
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackUnicorn View Post
A baby can have a heart condition that prevents them from sucking hard enough to 'order' their rations of milk from the boobies. That's at least how I understood the trouble in one family I know.

Also, for whatever reason, not all women really produce enough milk. Can Magdlyn or Derbie or someone else in the know explain why?
Well, what I meant is, I used to think formula was only for babies who couldn't breastfeed for whatever reason (allergy being the one I was most familiar with). Then I learned that the huge majority of non-breastfeeding had nothing to do with that. A bunch are because the mother doesn't want to for whatever reason (the most stupid I've heard was "that would be incest!") ranging from practicality (the mother works full-time and doesn't want to stop or pump her milk out for someone else to feed the baby) to some weird things ("formula is better for the baby because it's artificial!" lolwut?)
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 04-03-2011, 09:05 PM
nycindie's Avatar
nycindie nycindie is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Apple
Posts: 7,885
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tonberry View Post
Well, what I meant is, I used to think formula was only for babies who couldn't breastfeed for whatever reason (allergy being the one I was most familiar with). Then I learned that the huge majority of non-breastfeeding had nothing to do with that. A bunch are because the mother doesn't want to for whatever reason (the most stupid I've heard was "that would be incest!") ranging from practicality (the mother works full-time and doesn't want to stop or pump her milk out for someone else to feed the baby) to some weird things ("formula is better for the baby because it's artificial!" lolwut?)
Or they don't want their breasts to sag, or have breast implants, which I believe is not good for breastfeeding, or just believe that breastfeeding isn't necessary if there's formula that does the "same" thing. When I was 19, I remember my boyfriend's sister putting ice packs on her breasts because they were so swollen and heavy with milk but she wasn't breastfeeding. I never knew why not.
__________________
The world opens up... when you do.

"Oh, oh, can't you see? Love is the drug for me." ~Bryan Ferry
"Love and the self are one . . ." ~Leo Buscaglia "

An excellent blog post on hierarchy in polyamory:
solopoly.net/2014/10/31/why-im-not-a-secondary-partner-the-short-version/
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 04-03-2011, 09:19 PM
Tonberry Tonberry is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,393
Default

Right, there is a whole variety of reasons, some based on the child, some on the mother, some on both. I used to think of breastfeeding as happening unless there was a medical reason not to, then realised it was often down to personal preference.

I learned something similar about C-section. There again, I thought it only happened when there were going to be complication with a natural birth, but learned that it is most commonly used for completely different reasons without being medically required at all.
I learned about that completely by accident, by the way, when seeing figures that in pretty much all western countries, there is a higher death rate for both the mother and the kid if the birth happens in the hospital vs in other contexts such as home. The main reason turned out to be that C-section are more likely to result in the death of the mother, kid or both than natural birth did, with the paradoxical result that parts of the countries that didn't have as much access to hospital had a lower death rate when giving birth.

Note that it's a comparison in western countries, where the pregnant woman still had access to medical attention throughout the pregnancy, lived in an environment less prone to infections and usually had a midwife, doctor or nurse around for the birth.

Last edited by redpepper; 04-07-2011 at 06:06 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 04-03-2011, 09:20 PM
BlackUnicorn's Avatar
BlackUnicorn BlackUnicorn is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 906
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tonberry View Post
I don't know much about breastfeeding, except for the fact that even though I don't want biological children, if I adopt a child who is still young I want to breastfeed them, so I looked into inducing breastfeeding without a pregnancy a bit.
Still, I can't help but to wonder - is it easy for women who have not given birth themselves to induce lactation? I'm super-sensitive to all sex hormones, so are there strong side affects to taking whatever it is you need to take for that to happen?
__________________
Me: bi female in my twenties
Dating: Moonlightrunner
Metamour: Windflower

Last edited by redpepper; 04-07-2011 at 06:06 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 04-03-2011, 09:23 PM
BlackUnicorn's Avatar
BlackUnicorn BlackUnicorn is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 906
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tonberry View Post
I learned something similar about C-section. There again, I thought it only happened when there were going to be complication with a natural birth, but learned that it is most commonly used for completely different reasons without being medically required at all.

I believe we've gone off-topic enough to split the thread, at this point.
Maybe a 'Pregnancy and Breastfeeding' thread?

C-section up here is proscribed to women who have severe anxiety related to giving birth. I have only heard really horrible pregnancy and giving birth stories, so I think I would qualify at this point .
__________________
Me: bi female in my twenties
Dating: Moonlightrunner
Metamour: Windflower
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 04-03-2011, 09:26 PM
Tonberry Tonberry is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,393
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackUnicorn View Post
Still, I can't help but to wonder - is it easy for women who have not given birth themselves to induce lactation? I'm super-sensitive to all sex hormones, so are there strong side affects to taking whatever it is you need to take for that to happen?
Not everyone will be able to, and not everyone who does will produce enough milk. The main goal though is to create more skin contact between the adoptive mother and the child, since the kid had to go through being abandoned and needs to recreate strong links. The breasfeeding becomes a very bonding experience even when it's supplemented with other sources (either formula or other breastmilk from someone else).

You can actually induce lactation without hormones at all, although it's even less likely to succeed. The breast needs to be constantly stimulated (I don't mean non-stop, I mean several times a day) and will eventually start producing the milk.

When the adoption is going to be on a newborn, typically you're given hormones during the bio-mom's pregnancy so you can start breastfeeding right away. It's apparently easier if you've been pregnant before. I assume it would also be easier if you have breastfed before, whether you were pregnant or not, but nothing I read stated so specifically.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 04-04-2011, 12:36 AM
nycindie's Avatar
nycindie nycindie is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Apple
Posts: 7,885
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tonberry View Post
I learned something similar about C-section. There again, I thought it only happened when there were going to be complication with a natural birth, but learned that it is most commonly used for completely different reasons without being medically required at all.
Yes, usually to accommodate the doctor's schedule. Can't let a birth interrupt a golf game!
__________________
The world opens up... when you do.

"Oh, oh, can't you see? Love is the drug for me." ~Bryan Ferry
"Love and the self are one . . ." ~Leo Buscaglia "

An excellent blog post on hierarchy in polyamory:
solopoly.net/2014/10/31/why-im-not-a-secondary-partner-the-short-version/
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 04-04-2011, 02:05 AM
Magdlyn's Avatar
Magdlyn Magdlyn is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Metro West Massachusetts
Posts: 4,087
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tonberry View Post

...if I adopt a child who is still young I want to breastfeed them, so I looked into inducing breastfeeding without a pregnancy a bit. But that's pretty much as far as I went.
Many women can nurse an adopted baby. the factors that make it more successful are having a younger baby (since older ones will have become accustomed to bottle nipples), and pumping one's breasts frequently in the months preceding the adoption (ie: every 2 hours around the clock, with one 4 hour rest at night).

Quote:
That, and until fairly recently, I actually thought the only cases when babies weren't breastfed were when they were allergic to breast milk (my younger brother was so we fed him formula instead).
Babies can't be allergic to breastmilk, it's much more likely he was sensitive to certain foods your mom ate, that passed into her milk.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackUnicorn View Post
A baby can have a heart condition that prevents them from sucking hard enough to 'order' their rations of milk from the boobies. That's at least how I understood the trouble in one family I know.
Ill babies, or premies, can have trouble being strong enough to suckle properly, but can be taught to as they grow. The mother can pump milk and give it by another method (syringe, spoon, small cup) until the baby grows stronger. A heart condition would be a really good reason to breastfeed, or provide the mother's pumped milk at least. If he needs surgery, human milk will greatly speed recovery.

Quote:
Also, for whatever reason, not all women really produce enough milk. Can Magdlyn or Derbie or someone else in the know explain why?
Actually it is much more common to have an oversupply. Rarely a mother may have this or that condition, a congenital abnormality, or breast reduction, or retained piece of placenta, which can reduce supply. It's much more likely she thinks she doesnt have enough, because you can't measure it as you can with bottles. But you can weigh a baby before and after a feed to see how much he took. Also sufficient diaper output can be checked.

Giving bottles of formula or pacifiers can of course, reduce a good supply.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nycindie View Post
Or they don't want their breasts to sag, or have breast implants, which I believe is not good for breastfeeding,
Actually it's fine to breastfeed with implants, esp the way they are done nowadays.

Quote:
or just believe that breastfeeding isn't necessary if there's formula that does the "same" thing.
sigh...

Quote:
Still, I can't help but to wonder - is it easy for women who have not given birth themselves to induce lactation? I'm super-sensitive to all sex hormones, so are there strong side affects to taking whatever it is you need to take for that to happen?
It's very rare women take oxytocin nasal spray. As I said above, to make milk, stimulate your breasts as frequently as the baby would nurse. Google Supplemental Nursing System, which can deliver a supplement while the baby nurses. Most adoptive moms do not produce a full supply, but will produce some. Every drop of white gold helps!
__________________
Love withers under constraint; its very essence is liberty. It is compatible neither with envy, jealousy or fear. It is there most pure, perfect and unlimited when its votaries live in confidence, equality and unreserve. -- Shelley

The single biggest problem with communication is the illusion that it has taken place. --Shaw

me: Mags, female, pansexual, 59, loving and living with
miss pixi, female, pansexual, 37

Last edited by redpepper; 04-07-2011 at 06:07 AM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
breastfeeding

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 06:47 AM.