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  #21  
Old 06-17-2011, 02:14 AM
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I wrote: "Running from non-attachment is silly." Then I edited the post to say "Running from attachment is silly." That's what I had meant to say. But the edit, strangely, did not stick. And then it timed out on the site's software, so I cannot fix it!

... flowingly, River ...
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  #22  
Old 06-17-2011, 03:44 AM
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Maybe both are true!
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The world opens up... when you do.

"Oh, oh, can't you see? Love is the drug for me." ~Bryan Ferry
"Love and the self are one . . ." ~Leo Buscaglia "

An excellent blog post on hierarchy in polyamory:
solopoly.net/2014/10/31/why-im-not-a-secondary-partner-the-short-version/
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  #23  
Old 06-17-2011, 07:39 PM
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arrival!

this is the vivid inside of the poem
this is the end of all searching
this is the indwelling of the found world
gone is the shroud of seeking
what was known at a distance
is now
the vivid inside of the world

images fall away

this is no fiction
this is the essence of life
this is the falling away of masks
this is the dropping away of armor
this is the unfolding mystery

this is home!

this i've always known
this is the final truth
this is the nature of things
this is home!

all of the givers know it
all who shiver glow it
any of us may instantly bestow it
this is home!
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  #24  
Old 06-20-2011, 04:56 PM
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In my opening post here I said,
"We realize, deeper and deeper, that while we are distinct individuals we are also utterly continuous and identical with all of life, all of existence."
At the time I wrote these words I had some understanding about them but little depth of experience and living of this supreme reality about what we are, and where we are--and who we are.

I had the fire of intuitive insight without the "miracle" of the watery element of feeling. It is far from enough to have firey insight, and such vision leaves us thirsty enough to be bitter, angry, frustrated, broken, and messy. I've been all of these things ... and now I am growing watery roots in this world.

I wrote those words. But I did not know them.

Amazing, isn't it?
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  #25  
Old 06-21-2011, 01:36 PM
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A story about non-attachment & loving relationships

http://www.polyamory.com/forum/showp...3&postcount=51
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  #26  
Old 06-23-2011, 12:03 AM
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Chores

What a chore and a bore
mindfulness seemed! Washing the dishes mindfully
in order that one day I can win the prize!
-- Gawd I hated washing dishes! --
There must be a pot at the end of the rainbow, somewhere!
Surely this cannot be it!

Yet--just moments ago--turning the lid on the saki bottle
to close it!
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  #27  
Old 07-02-2011, 04:42 PM
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From Start Where You Are: A Guide to Compassionate Living, by Pema Chodron


Only to the degree that we've gotten to know our personal pain, only to the degree that we've related with pain at all, will we be fearless enough, brave enough, and enough of a warrior to be willing to feel the pain of others. To that degree we will be able to take on the pain of others because we will have discovered that their pain and our own are not different. (p. 4)

*****

The basic notion of lojong is that we can make friends with what we reject, what we see as "bad" in ourselves and in other people. At the same time, we learn to be generous with what we cherish, what we see as "good". If we begin to live in this way, something in us that may have been buried for a long time begins to ripen. Traditionally, this "something" is called bodhichitta, or awakened heart. It's something that we already have but usually have not discovered. ...

The basic message of the lojong teachings is that if it's painful, you can learn to hold your seat and move closer to that pain. Reverse the usual pattern, which is to split, escape. ... Lojong introduces a different attitude toward unwanted stuff; if it's painful, you become willing not just to endure it but also to let it awaken your heart and soften you. You learn to embrace it.

If an experience is delightful or pleasant, usually we want to grab it and make it last. We're afraid that it will end. We're not inclined to share it. The lojong teachings encourage us, if we enjoy what we are experiencing, to think of other people and wish for them to feel that. Share the wealth. Be generous with your joy. Give away what you most want. Be generous with your insights and delights. Instead of fearing that they're going to slip away and holding on to them, share them.

Whether it's pain or pleasure, through lojong practice we come to have a sense of letting our experience be as it is without trying to manipulate it, push it away, or grasp it. The pleasurable aspects of being human as well as the painful ones become the key to awakening bodhichitta. (p. 7)
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  #28  
Old 04-24-2013, 10:25 AM
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BelleInconnue BelleInconnue is offline
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Default Loving this thread!

I identify as Buddhist myself and it is nice to see this thread I feel in polyamory I really get the chance to practice the 4 brahmaviharas very well--lovingkindness, compassion, sympathetic joy, and equanimity. My spiritual practice is a definite must in going poly because it helps me deal with old conditioning and discomfort as it comes up in a healthy, constructive way--being present with complete acceptance of whatever arises, giving myself unconditional love and compassion rather than looking outwardly to my partner for validation when I feel insecure, etc. Again, thanks for starting this thread!
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It matters not who you love, where you love, why you love, when you love or how you love, it matters only that you love."--John Lennon
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  #29  
Old 05-04-2013, 03:29 AM
Kajibabu Kajibabu is offline
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Thumbs up agreed

I agree this opinion fully...

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackUnicorn View Post
Okay, somewhat old-ish thread, but hey, I'll post my two cents anyway.

From a Tibetan perspective, the Buddhist teaching (dharma) is a ladder, composed of three steps;

1) Theravana or Souther Buddhist tradition, which is mostly concerned with liberating an individual. This is sometimes in the West seen as the 'essence' of or 'original' Buddhism, as per our obsession with age (the older it is, the more original it must be, and originality is good).
2) Mahayana or Northern Buddhist tradition, which is concerned with grasping two spiritual concepts; 'emptiness' and 'lovingkindness' or 'compassion', and cultivating a 'boddhichitta' consciousness instead of the 'arhat' consciousness of the Southern Tradition..
3) Vajrayana or Tibetan Buddhism, which is concerned with becoming a Buddha through meditation, yoga and adequate grasp of the two, from this perspective, 'preliminary' steps.

Mahayana tradition is in general more accepting of women and homosexuality. However, the Western idea of Buddhism being a sort of 'If it harms none, do as thou wilt' of the East in what comes to issues of sexuality is often somewhat wishful thinking. I understand the thorough disappointment with Western patriarchal monotheist traditions which fuels this search for a more accepting tradition, but there is no religion on Earth which is free from prejudice or can be totally harmonized with our personal understanding of sexuality.

That being said, I feel that the Vajrayana Tradition is perhaps most accessible to Westerners who seek to transform desire and positive self-image into spiritual tools. Buddhist concerns of non-duality and interbeingness speak to profoundly feminist concerns, as well. However, polyamory coming from a language of 'needs' isn't really coherent with Buddhism in my mind. The point in most Eastern esoteric traditions is realizing that the Experience, the Experiencer and the Experienced are one and the same. Thus I seek to become free of addictions in the form of 'needs' and 'wants' instead of constantly looking for new partners to feed into them.
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  #30  
Old 05-15-2013, 01:06 AM
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I don't see how they could really conflict buddhism to me never was about believing any particular thing deffinetly all about the dharma I sometimes look into it. (^^) If one needs more info Im sure I can probably help but Im not teacher.
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