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  #11  
Old 12-05-2010, 07:49 AM
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LovingRadiance LovingRadiance is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ray View Post
Homeschooling is an interesting topic for me. I can never decide whether it's wonderful or awful.
It's definitely both.

We're lucky on this note to be in Alaska.
Check out this website-
www.ideafamilies.org

That's a state program that coordinates homeschoolers in Alaska. It's not the ONLY one-but it's the biggest. It rocks.

We're connected to HUNDREDS of other families all within a 100 mile radius of us. If we wanted to we could participate in activities with other families every day of every week of the whole year!

Our whole Scout Pack was homeschoolers and it was a HUGE pack.
I organized the homeschool prom for 2 years-well over 100 kids each year attended.
We have a swim co-op that meets weekly-75 students.

My kids have more socialization as homeschoolers than I ever had as a public school student-and they are getting a MUCH better education. Our public education system is the pits.

It wasn't a religious reason for us-it was academic. I want my kids to have a chance at a GOOD future-and the public school isn't the ticket. All of them are high on their test scores and at 10 years old Sweet Pea is halfway through 6th grade and reading and writing at a highschool level.
Our oldest went to public school for kindergarten-the teacher told me he couldn't do a thing for her-he was teaching kids their abcs, she was already reading chapter books and doing multiplication. Halfway through the year I took her out.
She went to a private school for 1st-3rd grade, but I couldn't afford to keep her there even though we loved it.

I pull a pretty tight rein on what I expect OF their work-but how we organize the days/weeks/months-I'm lenient on. It's worked well-they're all ahead.
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  #12  
Old 12-05-2010, 07:50 AM
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Admittedly-I do often wish I could have that 6 hour a day break-but I figure someday they'll all be grown and then I'll have many more than 6 hours a day to remember all these days when I was right there.
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  #13  
Old 12-05-2010, 02:38 PM
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It's been quite interesting reading the comments here about US homeschooling and the reasons behind it... I was rather under the impression that it was only religious nutters and brain-fried hippies that did it and am glad to have been proven wrong! I'm also a little shocked at how bad the school system seems to be in many states... here in the UK our schools ain't perfect but I don't think any of them are that bad! (well maybe one of our local ones here is but that's more down to it covering a really bad area of town and therefore getting the worst kids)

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I've met adults who don't know that we had the American Revolution.
Wait... what? What did they think Independence Day was all about?
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  #14  
Old 12-05-2010, 05:52 PM
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I'm in the uk and home educating my 6year old (and 2.5year old).

We go out to home educating group meetups at least twice a week, we spend lots of time at friends houses cooperating organising science activities or doing cooking etc. Here in the uk she would have been expected to start school full time just 2 months after her fourth birthday. She was nowhere near ready, so we're into our third year of home educating and mostly really enjoying it.

Like LR I would love some days to have that 6 hours alone (or with my toddler) but its not worth it once we consider the downsides of school for our family. My husband is a pilot, can't take any of his holidays during school holiday times so we wouldn't be able to go on holidays hardly at all with him. He also works a lot of evenings and weekends, so he would very rarely see our daughter if she was in school.
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Old 12-05-2010, 06:35 PM
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For me the issue was about my child, being quiet shy in social settings. However, super confident and okay in social situations where she knows people.

Her private school, was withholding information from us about her needing extra time to write on papers and tests. Turns out she has a learning issue called dysgraphia. She was bullied by a group of boys. The lead one had a horrible home life. Small school struggling more interested in keeping the tuition and covering the damage. However, when she got the black eye and they didn't call or do anything, hell rained down from a pretty angry Mom (me) and Dad.

The public school is very good in our town. However, we made a decision for the smaller group as for her low immune system. Turns out we were wrong.
She is an only child. With her health issues we needed her to heal.

I did love huge parts of homeschooling. However, in the long run it was best for her to go to school. We are once again dealing with some bullies. She is just very meek, comes from her birth mothers personality. She is in therapy to deal with her illness and the public school is taking a hard line with the kids. She is also learning to stand up for her self.

If I had more children, I would homeschool her. We have been fortunate for the past two years that she has had the two best teachers in her grade.
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  #16  
Old 12-05-2010, 10:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrDreadful View Post
It's been quite interesting reading the comments here about US homeschooling and the reasons behind it... I was rather under the impression that it was only religious nutters and brain-fried hippies that did it and am glad to have been proven wrong! I'm also a little shocked at how bad the school system seems to be in many states... here in the UK our schools ain't perfect but I don't think any of them are that bad! (well maybe one of our local ones here is but that's more down to it covering a really bad area of town and therefore getting the worst kids)
Ummm, yeah. We've got lots of "bad areas" in the States. If you mean poor people who don't pay much taxes for school facilities, and whose kids grow up in situations where they feel they need gang protection to survive.

Quote:

Wait... what? What did they think Independence Day was all about?
How about "America is Number One! And we're gonna prove it by drinking lots of Bud and shooting off fireworks in each others' faces!" ?
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  #17  
Old 12-05-2010, 11:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Magdlyn View Post
Ummm, yeah. We've got lots of "bad areas" in the States. If you mean poor people who don't pay much taxes for school facilities, and whose kids grow up in situations where they feel they need gang protection to survive.
Okay, yeah... we have that in the UK too, was kinda going for tongue-in-cheek there but I think my aim was off. Basically the worst schools are invariably the inner city attached-to-a-council-estate type thing... but overall the education system here is pretty good. Shame the gubmint keep dicking about with it. Interestingly there is a trend developing where poor inner city kids from unemployed families are rebelling by performing well academically and getting decent jobs!

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Originally Posted by Magdlyn View Post
How about "America is Number One! And we're gonna prove it by drinking lots of Bud and shooting off fireworks in each others' faces!" ?
<culturalstereotyping>YEE-HAW! U! S! A! *splode*</culturalstereotyping>
It saddens me when people are ignorant of their own heritage. There are people here who don't know what the Battle of Britain was.
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  #18  
Old 12-06-2010, 04:26 PM
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I have to toss in a comment on this topic myself. After trying to work "within" the system for change for years, I also finally gave up and pulled our last son out of public school. This was before the home schooling movement really became an entity so it was a hard go.

From my perspective the public education system overall is in shambles. I'm speaking of this in regards to the U.S of course, but from interaction with numbers of people all over the world, I suspect that in general it's not much different.

Why ?

It seems we've lost sight of what "learning" truly is !

"Learning" is NOT about being able to parrot back a given list of factoids on a given subject. It's not about absorbing massive amount of information like a computer system to have at ready recall should we need it.

"Learning" is about connecting dots. About critical thinking skills. And above all, "learning" is about understanding the VALUE of learning ! And the love of it. You hear people espouse phrases such as "life-long learners" and it seems to sail right over the top of most.

Life and living is a constant evolution. Flexibility is paramount. If you fail to develop the skills of not only memory, but of fitting the pieces together in different ways to adapt to life's changes, your life will be one of hardship and struggle.

And this more than anything seems to be what's missing from public education.

We no longer attempt to teach people how to THINK !
Because "thinking" is VERY dangerous to any entrenched institution. Just learn the facts folks - don't go asking questions or rocking the boat !

GS
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  #19  
Old 12-06-2010, 09:05 PM
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Actually GS I have to speak up on this one - the high school my daughters go to, and the course my 2nd is planning to enrol in does teach critical thinking the entire course is designed to make sure the kids know how to think for themselves - to not spout out the answers - to really question and think for themselves... it also has a component on social awareness - via volunteering in the community...

As soon as this became available I heaved a sigh of relief - because if the program wasn't available I would thoroughly agree with you - the program is the International Baccalaureate - and it is taught worldwide (it took our school 15 years to reach the standard required to become a Baccalaureate school - definitely worth the effort )

You can read more about it here http://www.ibo.org/
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  #20  
Old 12-06-2010, 11:29 PM
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We don't have kids, but Karma and I have had a lot of in depth talks about this, for our if maybe one day kids.

Mostly for all the reasons already stated.

American schools suck. And a lot of it isn't the teachers, it's the polotics they are forced to play in order to keep a job. My sister in law was a teacher at a last chance school for toubled kids, and she quit because she was spending more time there than with her own daughter and not getting paid for the majority of the time she put in. She loved the kids and cared so much about their success, but she wasn't given the tools needed to provide what they needed. When she realized how much she was paying out of pocket, it just didn't make sense for her to stay in a no win situation.

Karma and I both had problems with school because we weren't challenged, so we gave up.

I like the idea of homeschooling because I can provide one on one attention. If they need more help on one thing, but a more accelerated plan for something else, I can do that. I can take them places and show them how what they're learning applies to real life.

Socializing is a big issue for us. I went to a very open, very arts enriched, very integrated school. We didn't have cliques. Sure people hung out with those they had things in common with, but many people hung out with people from different "groups".

Karma went to a school where there were cliques upon cliques, with lots cruelty going on in the halls.

I want my kids to have an open mind and judge people on who they are, not what color they are or religion they practice. Are they a good person? Great then why the hell does any of the rest matter?

So how do I provide that homeschooling? I've found plenty of groups to do that with. To do group field trips and whatever.

So in my opinion, homeschooling, at least in America, when done by parents who actualy care about their childs education, is a great thing.
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