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  #11  
Old 01-21-2011, 06:11 PM
Charlie Charlie is offline
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Default "How to light a fire" or "Finding your tent stakes with a cell phone display"

I'm re-posting this link for two reasons: Its principles lie at the very root of Scouting in the United States and, more to the point, it is fun.

http://www.inquiry.net/traditional/beard/ohb/index.htm

Folklore is defined as artistic communication in small groups. Folklore, of any kind, is dualistic: conservative, yet dynamic. The future for Scouting seems to fall subject to this. How does Scouting conserve its primary, historical ethical principles while dynamically moving into the 21st century so as to remain a viable resource for empowering young people?

I expect that it will be a combination of organic development and forced social change. The fear, for those of us who know the benefits of Scouting, is that it will hold so closely to its conservative principles that it will in effect become out of touch and obsolete.

Sounds challenging, at best. How does one teach young people about solid fuel combustion (campfire) and culinary artistry (foil dinners) through a blog, tweet, post, thread, or text?
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  #12  
Old 01-21-2011, 06:48 PM
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LovingRadiance LovingRadiance is offline
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Originally Posted by lovinhimloviner View Post
As a Cub Scout leader my self I know there is still a lot of great things for boys to learn. This year last year was the 100th birthday for scouting. They have re done our scouting books and change some things up a little. It seems to be focusing mainly on respect, decisions and knowledge. As a leader I can do all kinds of great things with the boys in that one hour a week, but with out the parents support it is hard to get everything done. I have a younger group and can't wait for them to get to the point where they are doing really cool stuff. A good foundation is needed in any part of our lives so that is what we are doing now.

The truth is there just isn't the support for the kids to learn this type of stuff any more. Peoples lives are too busy to take their kids to scouts an hour a week.
Very true. I was a leader all through cubscouts. It was a lot of work. The two nearest boyscout troops to us are both 30-45 minute drives away. The meetings are 2 hours long. So that's a 4 hour evening for us. One meets on Tuesdays, the other on Thursdays.
It's not something we can do as a family, because we can't get home til nearly 11pm. Our 3 year old HAS to be in bed before that or she'd make hell for all of us. The 10 year old who would be doing the scouting in the first place, SHOULD be in bed before that.
Not to mention dinner, there is no time to make a dinner before scouting, there's no food at the meeting-so that means leaving there and scarfing fast food for him once a week.


It's a bummer.
I looked up starting a new scout troop or doing his scout stuff as an individual except for the bigger weekend events, which he could do with the groups. But that wasn't an option.
Furthermore, both groups have primarily highschool boys and no middle school boys-so he feels totally out of touch with them and isn't interested in "hanging out" with them.

While I don't mind being a supportive scout parent, it sure would be nice if it were possible for the weekly meetings if we could switch off with another family to take both boys. But-there aren't any.
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  #13  
Old 01-22-2011, 02:48 PM
GroundedSpirit GroundedSpirit is offline
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Originally Posted by lovinhimloviner View Post
As a Cub Scout leader my self I know there is still a lot of great things for boys to learn...............As a leader I can do all kinds of great things with the boys in that one hour a week, but with out the parents support it is hard to get everything done. .........
The truth is there just isn't the support for the kids to learn this type of stuff any more. Peoples lives are too busy to take their kids to scouts an hour a week.
You're correct on the 'support' problem.
And what's missed here is that the whole (or big part) of scouting is based on self interest and desire. The kids have to have that desire themself, albeit encouraged by good mentors (leaders, parents, other interested adults). A meeting or two a week cannot POSSIBLY accomplish serious forward progress, only play a supporting role.

Of course this applies more to Boy/Girl scouts than Cubs or Brownies. The whole Merit Badge program is intended for kids to pursue interests and knowledge on their own. To seek out the proper mentors that have the knowledge in the various areas. That networking itself is a valuable skill !

This is usually overlooked.
We live in a society where we expect people to "provide" for us ! If it's not handed to use on a silver tray we cry foul. It's all THEIR fault I'm a schmuck !

Don't get me going..............

GS
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  #14  
Old 01-22-2011, 03:28 PM
Charlie Charlie is offline
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Default Getting going...

Silver tray...yep, I know that one. I sat through a high school graduation a couple of years ago and listened, appalled, to the superintendent and the principal claim that the graduates DESERVED our respect and pontificate d about how these kids were the "next greatest generation"...

It's not like the kids cured cancer, for crying out loud. They graduated high school. Yes, congratulations, but now it's time to get to work.

As they handed out the diplomas, I was struck with the image of high school graduates more appropriately being handed picks and shovels.

It has been my experience in the college classroom, and my colleagues will concur, that a large portion of incoming freshmen believe that the World owes them a living. It appears as though there are role models in their youth that feel the same and lead their young flocks to believe that life tastes better when eaten off a silver spoon. In talking to friends and relatives who teach in the public school systems, I have come to understand how the current paradigms in public education put our kids at a disadvantage when it comes to functioning in what my father always referred to as "The Real World".

A few years ago, I had the honor of building a Finnish soapstone masonry heater for a new Girl Scouts of the Glowing Embers Council facility in Kalamazoo. When asked what they, the girls, wanted for the new building, they almost unanimously said "a pizza oven". So, as a community, we made it happen. After completion, we taught the older girls how to fire the masonry heater and bake oven, leaving it them to teach the younger girls.
(I believe the build and the finished fireplace is on YouTube.) I bring this up because it remains in my mind as a fine example of the following statement:

"It takes a village to raise a child."

Inside and outside the classroom there remains a struggle to get the bulk of parents involved, and might I add accountable, for their children's education. While I detest the parental drive that forces a child to engage in activities that they would rather not, I think the parental responsibility is to stand firm in their child's involvement in activities that will enable them to be self-reliant, participating members of their community.
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  #15  
Old 01-25-2011, 03:50 AM
Charlie Charlie is offline
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This day in history:

January 24, 1908 - Robert Baden-Powell pioneers the Boy Scouts in England.
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  #16  
Old 01-25-2011, 07:15 PM
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Derbylicious Derbylicious is offline
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On the subject of merit badges I loved working towards them as a child. It gave me a sense of accomplishment. I started out with things that I already had a grasp on and worked out towards things that I had never experienced before. Some of it was positive and other things made me realize that they were things I really wasn't into at all. But now I have all sorts of info in my head to draw on if I need it.
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  #17  
Old 01-26-2011, 01:56 AM
Charlie Charlie is offline
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Originally Posted by Derbylicious View Post
On the subject of merit badges I loved working towards them as a child. It gave me a sense of accomplishment. I started out with things that I already had a grasp on and worked out towards things that I had never experienced before. Some of it was positive and other things made me realize that they were things I really wasn't into at all. But now I have all sorts of info in my head to draw on if I need it.
I like the tangible, physical records of accomplishments, though my wardrobe these days would "clash with the sash". I seem to still own a staggering amount of olive drab clothing, however...
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  #18  
Old 01-26-2011, 03:07 AM
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Derbylicious Derbylicious is offline
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I like the tangible, physical records of accomplishments, though my wardrobe these days would "clash with the sash". I seem to still own a staggering amount of olive drab clothing, however...
I still fit in my girl guide uniform.
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