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Old 03-07-2014, 05:37 PM
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Alan7388 Alan7388 is offline
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Default Newspaper coins word: Bopo, the "bourgeous polyamorous"

That would be Canada's The Globe and Mail. Nice article overall! Here's my writeup and (long) excerpt on Polyamory in the News:

http://polyinthemedia.blogspot.com/2...bourgeous.html

Alan M.
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Old 03-07-2014, 10:24 PM
Spock Spock is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan7388 View Post
That would be Canada's The Globe and Mail. Nice article overall! Here's my writeup and (long) excerpt on Polyamory in the News:

http://polyinthemedia.blogspot.com/2...bourgeous.html

Alan M.
The family was specifically polygynous more than polyamorous.

Also, living on a 30 acre farm doesn't make them bourgeoisie, just a little bit wealthier than the norm.

We already know that having money makes it easy to keep multiple lovers

I've wondered about having a second wife just so we have a full time parent at home with the kids...
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Old 03-07-2014, 11:12 PM
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SNeacail SNeacail is offline
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Bourgeous? Was it supposed to be "Bourgeois" or does it mean something different?
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Old 03-08-2014, 05:30 PM
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Magdlyn Magdlyn is offline
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I've wondered about having a second wife just so we have a full time parent at home with the kids...
Um, that would be a nanny.
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Old 03-09-2014, 01:52 PM
Tonberry Tonberry is offline
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Um, that would be a nanny.
But you have to PAY a nanny
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Old 03-12-2014, 01:12 PM
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Most academic research into polyamory has found that the community is overwhelmingly white, educated and affluent. The academics have also speculated that people from other demographics likely face more social backlash for deviating from social norms. They fear ostracism from careers, church, and rigid social expectations.

Anyways, it financially makes sense to have more than 2 working adults in a home. The West's nuclear family is a very new trend, and not a very successful one IMHO.
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Old 03-13-2014, 04:49 AM
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If rich people must be at the vanguard of the "poly movement," then so be it, I say. I quite like the good-looking polish it puts on our image for the rest of the world to see. Let "trailer park polys" be showcased later, after poly gains some general acceptance.

My V is far from rich but I admit we don't have kids either so I don't know how easily we'd handle that (financially). It does make sense to say that two adults working with one adult at home would eliminate the need for daycare and whatnot, so that's one cost offset.

Good article Alan; thanks for posting it.
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Old 03-13-2014, 10:17 AM
Tiberius Tiberius is offline
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Not sure I like the bit that says, "...they are the most conventional members of the “poly” sub-culture, a group that includes everything from orgy-obsessed swingers to S&M enthusiasts...."

Makes us sound like we're all into weird fetishes or something. I mean, sure, some of us are, but it's hardly a defining feature.
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Old 03-13-2014, 11:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdt26417 View Post
If rich people must be at the vanguard of the "poly movement," then so be it, I say. I quite like the good-looking polish it puts on our image for the rest of the world to see. Let "trailer park polys" be showcased later, after poly gains some general acceptance.

My V is far from rich but I admit we don't have kids either so I don't know how easily we'd handle that (financially). It does make sense to say that two adults working with one adult at home would eliminate the need for daycare and whatnot, so that's one cost offset.

Good article Alan; thanks for posting it.
There was a case of a "poly" couple losing their temper and murdering their third in NYC I believe. Here it is.

So there are some examples of lower-class people in the lifestyle hitting the news.

I think that one reason you typically see more affluent and educated people in the poly lifestyle is because the lifestyle requires very good emotional intelligence, impulse control, and communication skills. All three of those categories are positively correlated with income and education.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiberius View Post
Not sure I like the bit that says, "...they are the most conventional members of the “poly” sub-culture, a group that includes everything from orgy-obsessed swingers to S&M enthusiasts...."

Makes us sound like we're all into weird fetishes or something. I mean, sure, some of us are, but it's hardly a defining feature.
I have thought about that paradox. Here's the thing; people in alternative lifestyles have less inhibitions about being seen in public. Kinksters have group munches and other outtings. After all, BDSM is less new than polyamory in the public zeitgeist. Even with the release of such books as 50 Shades and the intense interest generated, academics and kinksters alike are trying hard to legitimize BDSM.

What I'm saying is that kinky and poly people are probably serving as a good inroad into the poly world. There are far fewer poly meetups and munches and many poly people are very private and/or not advertising. So you average investigative journalist will probably stumble into the BDSM scene before the poly scene, largely because there really isn't a poly scene in most places.
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Old 03-13-2014, 01:52 PM
opalescent opalescent is offline
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It is true that people who self-identify as poly tend to be better well off, white and well-educated. That's been my personal experience to some degree. My local community attempts to be more diverse in both race and class.

However, I suggest that there may be significant numbers of people who are in effect poly but don't use that term. Some of those people are likely to be minorities either in class or race. I think it may be somewhat similar to men who have sex with men but don't identify as gay, in part because gay is seen as a white identity. A similar dynamic may be at work here too.
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