Polyamory.com Forum  

Go Back   Polyamory.com Forum > Polyamory > Spirituality & Polyamory

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #61  
Old 11-30-2009, 03:47 AM
Quath Quath is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 504
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by River View Post
Food For Thought
- My new blog
http://mind4food.blogspot.com/
Congrats on the blog. I am sure it will be a pretty interesting experience.
Reply With Quote
  #62  
Old 11-30-2009, 04:11 AM
River's Avatar
River River is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: NM, USA
Posts: 1,894
Default

Thanks, Quath. ... Feel free to post comments at my new blog whenever you like. Same invitation to others here.
__________________
bi, partnered, available

River's Blog
Reply With Quote
  #63  
Old 11-30-2009, 07:05 AM
redpepper's Avatar
redpepper redpepper is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Canada
Posts: 7,639
Default

I love you River, just saying. I too was a "green child" I'm soo happy to here others were too.

This all makes me think of Crystal Children, anyone know of that idea? theory? I read a bit about it when my boy was young. Very interesting and is becoming more and more studied.... it's rather flaky so beware, but I can't help wonder why so many are beginning to wonder what these changes are that we feel happening to our people and our earth.
__________________
Anyone want to be friends on Facebook?
Send me your name via PM
My blog
Reply With Quote
  #64  
Old 12-15-2009, 02:37 PM
Ceoli Ceoli is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: London, UK
Posts: 900
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by River View Post
I'm of the opinion that diligent study reveals that peaking oil and gas production represents a far more precarious, even dangerous, situation than most of us realize. Precarious and dangerous because our present economy livelihoods are utterly dependent on the immediate availability of cheap oil and gas, which -- I think -- will not and cannot remain cheap enough for very long before we have serious and permanent infrastructure failure.
I completely agree with this, though I'll add that another huge, globally transforming problem that is far too under the radar is the rapid privatization of water. This not only immediately affects the economies of many places, but has an immediate and direct effect on the lives and health of billions of people in the developing world.
Reply With Quote
  #65  
Old 12-28-2009, 12:36 AM
Ravenesque's Avatar
Ravenesque Ravenesque is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: New York
Posts: 297
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ceoli View Post
I completely agree with this, though I'll add that another huge, globally transforming problem that is far too under the radar is the rapid privatization of water. This not only immediately affects the economies of many places, but has an immediate and direct effect on the lives and health of billions of people in the developing world.
This trend is disturbing. This problem was highlighted in a course I took on sustainability in Africa which focused on the environmental problems that are plaguing many there. I will post the title of the book we used. It is about 20 years old but still pertinent.

In poorer areas there is a lack of running water and people (very often women and children) have to travel miles to a standpipe or creek to gather water. The lines to gather water are long. It is a heavy burden to bring back. Nearby creeks are very often riddled with disease.

And so it has become a business to sell water at exorbitant prices. It is not like buying an Aquafina here to quench a moment's thirst. It is buying your drinking water... and your cooking water and your bath water from those who want to capitalize on the situation.

It is unfortunate.

~Raven~

Reply With Quote
  #66  
Old 12-28-2009, 12:46 AM
Ceoli Ceoli is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: London, UK
Posts: 900
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravenesque View Post
And so it has become a business to sell water at exorbitant prices. It is not like buying an Aquafina here to quench a moment's thirst. It is buying your drinking water... and your cooking water and your bath water from those who want to capitalize on the situation.
[/COLOR][/FONT][/B]
It's also become a source of political struggle. There are countries that live downstream of water supplies that are finding their reserves dried up due to countries located further upstream damming those supplies for themselves. I think pretty soon we'll be finding that most of our wars will be fought over water rather than oil.
Reply With Quote
  #67  
Old 12-28-2009, 12:56 AM
Ravenesque's Avatar
Ravenesque Ravenesque is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: New York
Posts: 297
Default

A situation was brought up in the same course where a country was dumping their waste near another poorer country and contaminating their water.

The water situation does seems a lot scarier than the oil issue. It is something you find yourself definitely taking for granted.
Reply With Quote
  #68  
Old 12-28-2009, 12:48 PM
GroundedSpirit GroundedSpirit is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: New England USA
Posts: 1,231
Default Auquifers

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ceoli View Post
It's also become a source of political struggle. There are countries that live downstream of water supplies that are finding their reserves dried up due to countries located further upstream damming those supplies for themselves. I think pretty soon we'll be finding that most of our wars will be fought over water rather than oil.
I would be worth noting to everyone concerned that the big corps are also impacting local aquifers - setting up huge bottling operations fed from local aquifers and even draining THEM dry for all the surrounding landowners !
We recently passed a local ordinance prohibiting such operations but surrounding towns/cities must do the same because of the geo spread of those underground aquifers.
It's something all citizen should be aware of and make sure your local governments/councils are also.
Reply With Quote
  #69  
Old 12-28-2009, 11:37 PM
Ceoli Ceoli is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: London, UK
Posts: 900
Default

Oh, absolutely! Corporations are a huge problem in this. A town nearby tried to fight a bottling company down here in drought ridden Florida and failed. It'll only get worse, and I doubt people are really interested in regulating the stuff.

There's a great documentary called "Flow" that's worth watching about this.
Reply With Quote
  #70  
Old 12-29-2009, 12:12 AM
River's Avatar
River River is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: NM, USA
Posts: 1,894
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ceoli View Post
I think pretty soon we'll be finding that most of our wars will be fought over water rather than oil.
There's a lot to be said for the perspective in that quote (above), but I would like to point out a crucial difference between oil (and fossil fuels, generally) and water. Terrestrial water is part of what is called "the water cycle." It is a cycle because water never really leaves the system. It doesn't get burned up -- like oil or coal.

Instead of disappearing, or being used up, water keeps cycling. And so long as it can be filtered or purified -- by natural or artificial means, all is well.

The problem is that (a) fresh water often becomes so polluted that recirculating it for use can be impracticable -- often because too expensive to do so, (b) local sources are improperly used, as in misalocation of precious resources -- this often has an ecomomic class basis, but also ties in with other misalocations, e.g., using lots of water to grow crops for export or to feed animals rather than people....

For millennia, water has been used to carry away wastes and pollutants. The so-called "developed world" does this in a big way by furnishing almost all houses with flush toilets--even in arid deserts, or during drought. Composting toilets are a viable alternative which allows the elimination of sewer/"brownwater" systems. All household drainage could be what is called greywater, and could serve to grow gardens, orchards and nearby urban polyculture.

One has to wonder about people who piss and shit in their drinking water and who insist that this is quite a civilized thing to do.
__________________
bi, partnered, available

River's Blog
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:13 AM.