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Old 02-23-2011, 02:14 AM
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River River is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlie View Post
In regards to the cultural paradigm of moral obligation, as Rand lays out in The Fountainhead, if the pinnacle of the self in "service" or "duty" to one's fellow humans is the alleviation of suffering, then we in turn must desire that there continue to be suffering. Should suffering cease altogether, then we have undermined the very thing that permits us to achieve a state of social, moral, spiritual grace.
No doubt there are people with heads (and hearts) stuffed so full of bovine feces that this will seem like a reasonable contribution to a discussion on the relevant matters, but that's no reason to conclude that everyone is thus infected. It is true that some people are attached to suffering ... bla, bla, blah.... Must I really spell it out?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlie View Post
This can be described as a satisfaction of the moral ego, one where we endeavor to stand before our fellows and say, "Look how much suffering I have saved people from!" Selflessness becomes a badge we wear to gauge our dedication to society.
It is true that some people are attached to suffering ... bla, bla, blah.... Must I really spell it out? I mean, really, are we supposed to buy into and then argue against this cheap trick, this slight of hand rhetorical garbage?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlie View Post
Selfishness, in contrast, can be determined to be the giving, fully and uncompromisingly, of one's purest state to society. In art, for example, it would be the unflinching conviction to make the thing that is in one's heart as it appears there and not censor it for the sake of not offending or upsetting the status quo.
No doubt egoistic selfishness has at times motivated individuals to take risks and do great things, even to offer their best (in art, or...), but always? Hardly. (Think of such flawed greats as MLK, Gandhi...) I would not advocate a sort of "altruism" which is fully "selfless" (in the sense of sacrificing the self entirely in the interest of "society" or "service"). That, too, is a conception rooted in malarkey (sp?). Who says our genuine self interest is in competition or at odds with the needs of "society" or others? People who draw the lines that way and argue for one vs the other "side" are fools.
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Last edited by River; 02-23-2011 at 02:23 AM.
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