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Old 01-14-2013, 12:15 PM
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MrFarFromRight MrFarFromRight is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Smack in the middle of The Spanish Revolution!
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(FINALLY!) I'm going to get closer to the main point of this thread.

No absolutes, but I do believe that GENERALLY women are more open to adapting. I don't know whether this is due to their wiring; the fact that [and I'm speaking about women here culturally/historically not as a macho stereotypist (in fact, I'm my favourite childminder)] dealing with children constantly, if you can't adapt... you're FINISHED!; or the fact that - as freeantigone has already pointed out - women are more often FORCED to adapt.

Maybe (generalising again), men have been so programmed to winning, to being alpha, that they [we] are more likely to feel that adapting / being flexible is a sign of weakness and therefore of a loser.
Ironic that (culturally/generally) by being so set on not being losers... we lose so much.

I also think [WARNING: approaching cliché!!!] that women are (generally) more open to love, more interested in making relationships work, more willing to DO THE WORK necessary to making relationships work.

Tragically, a male homosexual is STILL considered by a huge chunk of society to be less of a man. And - too often - many gays encourage this prejudice by exaggerating EITHER their femmeness or their butchness until it appears a party piece, a bit of melodramatics, a farce.

So - not going on personal observation, but it seems believable - a woman who has fought her way over the barrier against polyamory is capable of fighting her way over the barrier of set-in-concrete sexual orientation. Also, a person curious enough to want to EXPERIMENT with polyamory is maybe curious enough to experiment with bisexuality. And "you won't know whether you like it if you don't try it".
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If I can't dance, I want no part in your Revolution.
- Emma Goldman Anarchist and Polyamorous par excellence
The person who says something is impossible should not interrupt the person who is doing it.
- old Chinese proverb
And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.
~ Anais Nin
I'd rather have a broken heart / Than have a heart of stone.
- from "Boundless Love (A Polyamory Song)" by Jimmy Hollis i Dickson

Last edited by MrFarFromRight; 01-14-2013 at 03:04 PM. Reason: clarifying confused sentence structures
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