View Single Post
  #12  
Old 09-16-2011, 01:21 PM
MrFarFromRight MrFarFromRight is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Ping-ponging around Europe, trying to get a publishing concern off the ground
Posts: 718
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by naughty View Post
what a great thread! thank you for posting this. I will happily be looking into the above mentioned ones to read to my girls

you mentioned stereotyped sexual roles. might you also be interested in stereotyped gender roles? if so, there are some themes in the paper bag princess by Robert Munsch that might be relevant to what you are looking for. Its about a princess who rescues a prince, and then when she finally does realizes that her dignity is more important than the prince is and she runs off into the sunset by herself. The target age range is younger children...

as a side note, I think its great that you are writing stories that challenge (is that right word? i don't know) the dominant cultural idea of one true love solving all your problems. I wish you the best of luck in your writing
I'm in 2 minds about The Paper Bag Princess (Story by Robert N. Munsch; Illustrations by Michael Martchenko) Although the challenging of gender roles is excellent and it portrays a princess who can look after herself very well, thank you very much... it includes a cunning trap (set by the princess) which displays a dismaying lack of ecological awareness. (She tricks the dragon into burning 150 forests with its fiery breath, thus exhausting its fuel supply.) I've Googled it and it can be found (although I'm not sure that this is the whole text: there seem to be bits missing; also the wonderful illustrations are missing) at http://cculc.ccu.edu.tw/pdf/paper.pdf

To answer your original question:
Quote:
might you also be interested in [challenging] stereotyped gender roles?
In general I'm VERY interested, but there are quite a lot of excellent stories doing that. [Have a look at the Zipes book just for starters. It contains 3 sections: stories for younger readers, stories for older readers, and essays about fairy tales. It also includes a bibliography where you can find LOADS of stories - and novels - that challenge stereotyped gender roles.] So - back to your question - in order not to swamp this thread with recommendations about challenging stereotyped gender roles, I'd like to keep it about culture for children that challenges stereotyped sexual dynamics (and hope that poly-friendly stories for children will be pointed out to me).

And thanks for the side note!
Reply With Quote