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Magdlyn 04-02-2011 12:13 AM

Breastfeeding
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Derbylicious (Post 73971)
Yes there are cells (and with the cells DNA) in breast milk but drinking the breast milk doesn't incorporate that DNA into the child's system. The cells are simply digested and become nutrients for the child.

Derby, are you a La Leche League Leader or lactation consultant (IBCLC)? I am both. Just my credentials.

I have seen research which is very compelling. Many siblings took part in a study where one sibling was an organ donor to another. In all the cases, the 2 sibs who both breastfed from the same mother had much better success with the recipient not rejecting the donated organ. The conclusion was 2 breastfed siblings had more in common genetically than 2 sibs born of the same mother but not both breastfed by her.

Derbylicious 04-02-2011 12:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Magdlyn (Post 74197)
Derby, are you a La Leche League Leader or lactation consultant (IBCLC)? I am both. Just my credentials.

This is off topic, but let me address your post. I have seen research which is very compelling. Many siblings took part in a study where one sibling was an organ donor to another. In all the cases, the 2 sibs who both breastfed from the same mother had much better success with the recipient not rejecting the donated organ. The conclusion was 2 breastfed siblings had more in common genetically than 2 sibs born of the same mother but not both breastfed by her.

I'm a public health nurse. Siblings tend to be fairly similar genetically anyway, usually closer than to either of their parents. All the DNA that you're ever going to have you get at the moment of conception. Breast milk contains lots of antibodies that do no end of good for someone's immune system and it doesn't matter who the source of the breast milk is.

Magdlyn 04-02-2011 12:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Derbylicious (Post 74199)
I'm a public health nurse. Siblings tend to be fairly similar genetically anyway, usually closer than to either of their parents. All the DNA that you're ever going to have you get at the moment of conception.

This does not hold with current research.

You disagree with the findings of the organ donation study that found mutually breastfed children were more genetically similar than 2 non-breastfed siblings? How would you explain it then? Just a rhetorical question.

Tonberry 04-02-2011 12:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Magdlyn (Post 74207)
This does not hold with current research.

You disagree with the findings of the organ donation study that found mutually breastfed children were more genetically similar than 2 non-breastfed siblings? How would you explain it then? Just a rhetorical question. We can further discuss in PM if you'd like.

I believe Derby was saying that the study might simply have proven that being breastfed is beneficial and helps your body accept organ donation better, and have nothing to do with their DNA being more similar. Stop me if I'm wrong here.

Magdlyn 04-02-2011 12:50 AM

The study showed that even if the recipient was breastfed, they accepted the organ better if the donor was also breastfed by their shared mother.

Derbylicious 04-02-2011 12:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Magdlyn (Post 74211)
OK OK. A mod can split these posts out. The study showed that even if the recipient was breastfed, they accepted the organ better if the donor was also breastfed by their shared mother.

Was the recipient being breastfed during the organ transplant period? I can see how the organ could be better accepted. I'm just having a hard time understanding how it would still happen years after the children had both been weaned.

Magdlyn 04-02-2011 12:59 AM

This *might* be the study.

http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstr.../1/0000152.pdf

Derbylicious 04-02-2011 03:59 PM

So I read the article last night. Here are the points that I got out of it.
1. Organ rejection is an immune response which the body initiates when it identifies "forign" material.
2. If a baby is breastfed they are exposed to the mother's antigens early in life and their immune system becomes hyporesponsive to them.
3. If that baby (once grown) then has an organ transplant from someone who has those same antigens (someone related to them maternally) they are less likely to reject the organ.
4. There isn't enough evidence to say whether or not it matters if the donor is also breastfed as in most families all children from the same mother are breastfed (in the study there were only 2 out of 39 where the recipient was breastfed and the donor was not therefore statistical significance couldn't be shown).

All in all another fabulous reason to breast feed your children, but it doesn't change your basic genetic makeup.

Magdlyn 04-02-2011 08:05 PM

Yes, I stand corrected. As I said, I first heard of that study over 10 years ago (if it is the same study). I see it was done in 1985. Is it possible no further studies were done in the 25 years since?

I also slogged through those findings yesterday. So, it's an immune response thing, not a DNA thing.

Oddly I first joined La Leche League in 1985. In the years since I have worked with dozens of mothers who did not breastfeed their first child (or only did for a day or 2), because of lack of education or support, but went on to nurse subsequent children for much longer. It would be easy to find families like that for more research.

Anyway, my first point was that if babies are breastfed in a tribal situation by women other than their biological mother, they will then become more like those other women, immunologically at least (if not genetically)... The implications are enormous if you think about it.

Derbylicious 04-02-2011 08:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Magdlyn (Post 74370)
Oddly I first joined La Leche League in 1985. In the years since I have worked with dozens of mothers who did not breastfeed their first child (or only did for a day or 2), because of lack of education or support, but went on to nurse subsequent children for much longer. It would be easy to find families like that for more research.

Anyway, my first point was that if babies are breastfed in a tribal situation by women other than their biological mother, they will then become more like those other women, immunologically at least (if not genetically)... The implications are enormous if you think about it.

It's a little more difficult to find these families though where the second child has recieved an organ transplan from the first child (and a little unethical to perform unnesecery(sp?) organ trasplants on healthy individuals.

I was also wondering if the risk of rejection would go down further if a child was to recieve breast milk from a paternally related woman as a baby if the risk of rejection would go down even further in sibling to sibling transplants. I think I'm going to look into this some more and see if there has been any further research done because this is really interesting.

Maybe in the future they might be able to look at people who were fed with banked breast milk from a variety of sources to see how that impacts organ rejection. Although I don't know how often you would get a case that would fit those parameters.


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